Category Archives: New Films

Podcast August 4 – Dunkirk, Wakefield and Spider-Man

This week is a strange one, as one of the two main hosts was unavailable recovering from an unescapable illness. Luckily, frequent guest James Milliron was here to discuss recent war film Dunkirk, the latest epic from Christopher Nolan. It tells the tale of the beginning of World War II, as British troops are surrounded on all sides upon the beach closest to their homeland, with no traversable ships available to bring them there.

Tristan then regales Jimmy with his thoughts on the recent Spider-Man: Homecoming, as well as an indie character study starring Bryan Cranston as a fed-up New York lawyer who escapes his life by hiding in the garage across from his house, in Wakefield. In addition, Tristan saw a film from all the way back in 1991, The Indian Runner, which stars Viggo Mortensen in a star-making role as a broken Vietnam War vet who returns home to his cop brother David Morse only to find there’s not much left for him to do in life.

Happily there’s plenty more for you do today, such as listening in on the newest podcast below:

Remember, comment responsibly.

Podcast July 28 – Valerian, To the Bone and The Lovers

With a burst of refreshed energy, Cory and Tristan return from the nordic wonderland that is Iceland, hoping to catch up on a few flicks they missed in the past two weeks.

First, Tristan takes us on two very disparate sci-fi journeys, one in Luc Besson’s grand masterpiece Valerian and the City of Planets, an eye-popping visual piece of candy, and the other a vaucuous post-apocalyptic introspection for ape king Caesar in the latest sequel War for the Planet of the Apes – now able to compare to Cory’s notes.

Cory, in the meanwhile, took in the newest Netflix film To the Bone, starring Lily Collins as an anorexic outpatient tended to by Keanu Reeves. He also saw the latest schlockfest from Bruce Willis, First Kill, which contains a surprisingly deft turn from fallen star Hayden Christensen. Another feature Cory saw was The Lovers, a spring indie release that has marvelous roles for Tracy Letts and Debra Winger.

Before all that, Tristan caught up on the past few years with two Best Picture nominees – Philomena (2013) and Lion (2016) – that share the theme of a parent or child finding their missing child or parent. He also saw The Immigrant, a lesser known film featuring Joaquin Phoenix as a grifter who prays on Polish newcomer Marion Cotillard in 1920s Greenwich Village.

So much to listen to, but entertain yourselves by clicking below:

As always, remember to comment responsibly!

Podcast July 14 – War for the Planet of the Apes, Despicable Me 3 and The Lost City of Z

Cory was full of new releases this week as he managed to get into the theater not once, but thrice:

Despicable Me 3 : This third entry in the now Minion dominated universe has several plotlines, most notably one where Gru (Steve Carell) discovers a long-lost brother (also Steve Carell), and another where he must do battle with a nefarious ’80s-themed villian Balthazar Bratt (Trey Parker).

The Lost City of Z : Robert Pattinson continues to shine in indie fare in this Fitzcarraldo-inspired adventure into the jungle, where Pattinson accompanies Charlie Hunnam into the wilds of the Amazon. Terrible fates await, but helmer James Grey has a deft hand at dark drama and adventure.

War of the Planet of the Apes : The third entry in the now Ape dominated universe has Caesar defending his people once again from a last ditch effort by humankind to eradicate, or at least seek vengeance on the monkeys who have overrun the Earth. The leader of the humans is Woody Harrelson, but Andy Serkis still steals the show in all his mo-cap glory.

Tristan, on the other hand, went old-school and had a trio of older films to talk about:

The In-Laws (1979) : Alan Arkin and Peter Falk star in this buddy comedy where Falk is an “FBI agent”, perhaps, or he may just be a crazy person that ropes his son’s new father-in-law into a madcap adventure down to Honduras to take out a dictator on the same weekend as their children’s wedding. A highlight in both actors’ careers.

Willard (1971) : Another film that was unfortunately remade in 2003, Bruce Davison finds that he has the power to control rats, namely Ben and Socrates, and forces them to attack people that piss him off, like Ernest Borgnine.

David and Lisa (1962): Before he couldn’t handle robots in space, Keir Dullea couldn’t handle people touching him. For that, he seeks refuge in an outpatient hospital outside of Philadelphia, under the watchful eye of future Ben Franklin Howard da Silva. While there, David (Dullea) meets a lovely young girl Lisa (Janet Margolin) who only communicates in rhymes.

Join us once again as we dive straight into the wonderful world of cinema, and remember – comment responsibly:

Podcast July 7 – The Beguiled, The Little Hours and Okja

After we all collectively celebrated the 241st birthday of our crumbling country, a handful of cinephiles convened on cinemas nationwide to see a film that showcased a time when the people of America were actually split apart.

We at Interjections saw The Beguiled, a remake of the Clint Eastwood Southern gothic film from 1971. Sofia Coppola guides this version with a steady hand, reimagining Colin Farrell in the role of the wounded Union soldier finds himself in a woman’s boarding school run by Nicole Kidman and Kirsten Dunst. Elle Fanning contributes with another patent crazy vixen role.

Our special guest Kris joins Cory in his review of Cars 3 – waxing poetic about the majestic Pixar franchise as a whole. Here Lightning McQueen faces the most difficult challenge of his life – old age. Will Mater muck up the proceedings? Probably.

Speaking of old age, Tristan took in another recent indie film, the Jeff Baena helmed adaptation of The Decameron, The Little Hours, starring Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza and Kate Micucci as conflicted nuns living in a convent run by John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon. Dave Franco pulls his best Colin Farrell impression and hides in the convent as their gardener when he gets in trouble with his serf (Nick Offerman).

Kris brings us both a review of the Will Ferrell-Amy Poehler comedy The House, which has an amazing premise where the pair, finding themselves struggling to pay their daughter’s college tuition, naturally decide to open an underground casino in their basement. Will this redeem the surprisingly unfunny 2017 slate of comedies?

She also brings an overall review of the recent smash hit from Hulu, The Handmaid’s Tale, where Elisabeth Moss must discover what a woman’s true purpose is under the evil regime of Joseph Fiennes and other corrupt men.

Finally, Cory finishes off the week with the latest Netflix oddity – Bong Hoon-jo’s Okja, where Tilda Swinton pulls double-duty yet again as an evil capitalist attempting to turn a human-crafted giant pig into her newest bacon supply. ET be damned, the South Koreans really know how to tug at the heartstrings!

All this and some trailers, if you click on Aubrey Plaza below:

Remember, comment responsibly!

Podcast June 30 – Baby Driver, GLOW and Spider-Man: Homecoming

So you thought we were a little light the last two weeks, did you? You were hoping for more content in the Interjections podcast? Well, buddy, we’ve got some relief for you, in the form of eleven new films and television shows. Here’s the breakdown:

  • Baby Driver – the lengthily developed heist film from Edgar Wright stars Ansel Elgort (The Fault in Our Stars) as a tinnitis-inflicted getaway driver who wrestles with morals and feelings amidst a catalogue of sketchy characters including Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm, Jamie Foxx, Eisa Gonzalez, Jon Bernthal and Flea. He’ll aim to survive and get to his new favorite waitress Lily James.
  • G.L.O.W. – Alison Brie follows Community alum Gillian Jacobs to Netflix with this semi-historical look at a strangely progressive time in wrestling’s history, the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling, an outlier cable show that premiered in the early 1980s. Marc Maron is the director of the outfit, and he and Brie must figure out how to get their gang of misfits into action.
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming – Cory managed to sneak in a preview of next week’s massive Marvel blockbuster that sees Tom Holland take over everyone’s friendly neighborhood web-slinger. Here he’s under the guidance of OG Marvel elite Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr) as the kid must handle double duty as a superhero and a regular teen, avoiding supervillian Vulture (Michael Keaton).
  • Transformers: The Last Knight – Somehow someone greenlight a fifth Transformers film, and not only are Michael Bay and Mark Wahlberg back, but Stanley Tucci shills by playing a drunk Merlin. Anthony Hopkins joins other actors like John Turturro, Jon Voight, Ken Jeong, Frances McDormand, Alan Tudyk, Jerrod Carmichael and Bernie Mac in embarassing himself by participating in this debacle.
  • The Belko Experiment – Earlier in the year, John C. McGinley, Tony Goldwyn and Michael Rooker were sent down to Columbia to participate in a Battle Royale style corporate free-for-all. Cory caught up with this one.
  • Wilson – Woody Harrelson shines in this indie adaptation of Daniel Clowe’s graphic novel, yet another story about a disaffected man-child that can’t adjust to real life, much like Clowes’ other work Ghost World and Art School Confidential.
  • The Neverending Story – Tristan at long last viewed this cult classic children’s fable that sees a young boy immersed in the strange world of Fantasia, where Bastian (Noah Hathaway) must save the world from a mysterious dark force overtaking the horizon. Dog-like dragon Falcor aids him as he traverses the land filled with sadness swamps and wolf-vampires.
  • 47 Meters Down – Mandy Moore rides on the slim coattails of last summer’s The Shallows by facing down a shark underwater.
  • Rough Night – The lady version of Very Bad Things finds a bachelorette party gone awry populated by Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, Ilana Glazer, Zoe Kravitz and Jillian Bell.
  • Gifted – Chris Evans attempts to schmaltz up his image by taking on the role by mentoring a brilliant nephew who ends up in a nasty custody battle.
  • The Bad Batch – Ana Lily Aminpour’s sophomore film focuses on a strange apocalyptic landscape that former model Suki Waterhouse attempts to traverse, though she runs afoul of many an odd character, including Jason Momoa, Jim Carrey and Keanu Reeves.

All this and a ton of trailers below! Remember to comment responsibly:

Podcast June 23 – Once Upon a Time in Venice and Song to Song

It may not seem like it most of the time, but we here at Interjections work our darnedest to bring to you the hard-hitting news of our time.

This week finds us doing the Lord’s work by lowering ourselves in two dreadful directions: VOD, and Bruce Willis’ latest paycheck Once Upon a Time in Venice; and Terrence Malick’s latest opus Song to Song.

Those films may be some of the worst of the year, but that’s not the highlight of this week’s podcast – big news on the horizon came to us and the bulk of our discussion focuses on the upheaval on the Han Solo set, as directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were ousted in favor of everyone’s favorite Opie, Ron Howard.

Tune in below to hear Cory and Tristan discuss the latest developments and much more, remembering always to comment responsibly:

Podcast June 16 – The Blackcoat’s Daughter

So a bit of a surprise this week, a touch of a lull – Cory and Tristan were caught catching up on some of their favorite shows and enjoying the heat that vanquished the northeast.

While the weather attempted to overwhelm us, Tristan managed to take a look at one of his more anticipated horrors of early 2017, Oz Perkins’ The Blackcoat’s Daughter, which stars Kiernan Shipka and Lucy Boynton as boarding school inmates that are stuck in the snow over break while a demonic presence begins to stalk them.

With a lack of new material, Cory and Tristan resorted to interrogating frequent guest Jimmy with a similar game to What Do These Posters Mean? (played with Jeff) by giving him an upcoming film’s title and having him guess what they would be about.

Tune in below to see how he did, and if you should stop by Amazon to check out a new horror this weekend: